Homemade DIY word clock – Part 2

 

Introduction

In this part of the series we’ll cover the electronics. I’ll show you how I planned to build the internals of the clock and how I built it afterwards. Just like in the first part of the series I wrote this article while the build was in progress. I planned to leave errors I might make during this build in the articles, so that me and others can review them and don’t make the same mistakes again. If I find out that something is wrong, I’m going to mark it as wrong in the article and correct it afterwards:

mistake I made
correction

However in the last part we planned our clock in general. So now it’s on to planning the electronics that’ll give the clock a function. Continue reading Homemade DIY word clock – Part 2

Homemade DIY word clock – Part 1

In this article I have something stylish for you: It’s a project idea, I had for a while. And today I decided to finally build it! I’m pretty sure almost everyone of you has already seen a world clock, even if most of you have just seen them on pictures. For everyone else: It’s one of these clever clocks that do not display the exact time, but display a sentence, approximating the time instead, composed from different words that light up:

WordClock_02.JPG
Figure 1: A word clock

As these clocks can be pretty expensive, I decided to build some cheap ones myself. Three of them will be given to two friends of mine and one is for me. This article will be a description of the steps needed to create such a thing, so you can build your own one at home!

Continue reading Homemade DIY word clock – Part 1

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 3

Introduction

This is the final part of my series discussing my Macintosh Classic CRT project. In this article I want to give you a summary of my future ideas for the macdisplay project. I will write a dedicate article for each idea as soon as I finished it. The links to these articles will be in this one, so look at it as a table of contents. Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 3

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 2

This article will cover the software aspect of my Macintosh Classic project. The final solution is running on a BeagleBone Black, using it’s programmable realtime unit. If you want to learn more about PRU programming, you can do so here. If you haven’t done so already, I recommend you to read the other parts of this series. You can find the table of contents at the end of this article. Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 2

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 1

Introduction

This article will explain how the timing of the Macintosh Classic CRT works and how I tried (and failed) to interface it with the Raspberry Pi, and how I interfaced it with the BeagleBone Black’s PRU. This is a multipart series, you can find the table of contents, as always, on the bottom of the page. Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 1

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Intro

Almost one year ago I found an old Macintosh Classic, produced in the 1990’s in a basement. I bought it from the guy who used to own it and he told me, that he doesn’t know whether it is working or not and that it was standing there for about 20 years, so it was in a pretty bad shape. After it arrived at my apartment, I immediately plugged it in and switched it on. After the screen came on, it was pretty disappointing: It just displayed a checkerboard, which seems to be a pretty common issue with these models. This problem is caused by a variety of issues.

Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Intro

Simple collision avoidance AI in Unity3D

I’m currently working on a small 3D arcade game inspired by classical top down races in Unity3D. The game will feature enemy opponents, which means that they have to have at least some kind of AI. This AI consists of simple collision avoidance algorithm, so that the enemies don’t crash into walls constantly, and a very simple path following algorithm so that the opponents can find their way around the racetrack. I’ve built a quick prototype with simple boxes and a path. Continue reading Simple collision avoidance AI in Unity3D