Homemade DIY word clock – Part 2

 

Introduction

In this part of the series we’ll cover the electronics. I’ll show you how I planned to build the internals of the clock and how I built it afterwards. Just like in the first part of the series I wrote this article while the build was in progress. I planned to leave errors I might make during this build in the articles, so that me and others can review them and don’t make the same mistakes again. If I find out that something is wrong, I’m going to mark it as wrong in the article and correct it afterwards:

mistake I made
correction

However in the last part we planned our clock in general. So now it’s on to planning the electronics that’ll give the clock a function. Continue reading Homemade DIY word clock – Part 2

Homemade DIY word clock – Part 1

In this article I have something stylish for you: It’s a project idea, I had for a while. And today I decided to finally build it! I’m pretty sure almost everyone of you has already seen a world clock, even if most of you have just seen them on pictures. For everyone else: It’s one of these clever clocks that do not display the exact time, but display a sentence, approximating the time instead, composed from different words that light up:

WordClock_02.JPG
Figure 1: A word clock

As these clocks can be pretty expensive, I decided to build some cheap ones myself. Three of them will be given to two friends of mine and one is for me. This article will be a description of the steps needed to create such a thing, so you can build your own one at home!

Continue reading Homemade DIY word clock – Part 1

Quick look at: A cheap DIY function generator kit

Introduction

I recently bought some cheap electronic DIY kits from amazon, just because I wanted to improve my soldering skills. One of them was a cheap function generator based on the XR2206-IC. The complete kit with an enclosure costs about 14€ and it can be bought here. If you find a cheaper one let me know in the comments below and I’ll update the article! Continue reading Quick look at: A cheap DIY function generator kit

JXD S7800b android gaming tablet test

Today I want to write about a rather unusual device that was around for a pretty long time actually, but that I have never heard of before. I also did never encounter this device in the ‘real life’ server of this game. However, recently someone sent me a link to this device and I found it quite interesting. I’ve seen devices like the S7800b some years ago, but I think the concept of a tablet with built-in hardware controls just did not get very popular. I mean why should it? The buttons seem to distract you anyways when performing typical tablet activities like browsing the web or watching movies. And usually android games tend to be made for touch only devices, so is the JXD S7800b any good at all? Let’s find out!

JXD S7800b Continue reading JXD S7800b android gaming tablet test

About Apple’s new MacBook and Microsoft’s Surface

Apple held a keynote about their new Macintosh Laptop lineup yesterday and we watched it. Here are our personal thoughts about Apple’s new MacBooks. We’ll also write about what Microsoft presented earlier this week with it’s new Surface devices and compare it a bit with the new MacBook Pro. Please note that this article won’t feature a lot of technical details. It’ll just be a very critical review of the recent keynotes that were held by two big players in the it sector. Please also note that this is in no way a complete list or a comparison of the devices. This article is meant to be a short and informative summary of the last week’s keynotes, so you don’t have to watch them in full length!

UPDATE: Some YouTube videos were not embedded correctly (thanks wordpress!), so I added links to the article at the corresponding passages, if you’d like to watch them. I’m sorry if this causes any inconveniences.

Continue reading About Apple’s new MacBook and Microsoft’s Surface

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 3

Introduction

This is the final part of my series discussing my Macintosh Classic CRT project. In this article I want to give you a summary of my future ideas for the macdisplay project. I will write a dedicate article for each idea as soon as I finished it. The links to these articles will be in this one, so look at it as a table of contents. Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 3

How to use a relay module with your Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone or Arduino

Today I’ll just upload a short how to article, explaining how to use a relay module. Some time ago I bought a dirt cheap relay module for controlling high power LEDs with a Raspberry Pi on amazon. One of these modules cost about 2$ (shipping included), which is a fantastic price, so I ordered 5 modules. In this very short article I want to explain how you can use such a module in one of your projects. Continue reading How to use a relay module with your Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone or Arduino

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 1

Introduction

This article will explain how the timing of the Macintosh Classic CRT works and how I tried (and failed) to interface it with the Raspberry Pi, and how I interfaced it with the BeagleBone Black’s PRU. This is a multipart series, you can find the table of contents, as always, on the bottom of the page. Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Part 1

Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Intro

Almost one year ago I found an old Macintosh Classic, produced in the 1990’s in a basement. I bought it from the guy who used to own it and he told me, that he doesn’t know whether it is working or not and that it was standing there for about 20 years, so it was in a pretty bad shape. After it arrived at my apartment, I immediately plugged it in and switched it on. After the screen came on, it was pretty disappointing: It just displayed a checkerboard, which seems to be a pretty common issue with these models. This problem is caused by a variety of issues.

Continue reading Macintosh Classic CRT with modern linux computer – Intro

Raspberry Pi 3G mit Huawei E303 und DynDNS (Teil 2)

Einleitung

Fortsetzung von Teil 1!
In diesem Teil der Miniserie geht es nur darum, einen DynDNS Dienst auf dem Raspberry Pi einzurichten. Das ist, je nachdem welchen Dienst ihr gewählt habt, ein recht trivialer Vorgang. Ich verwende für meine Zwecke DuckDNS, ganz einfach aus dem Grund, weil das Einrichten schnell von der Hand geht und ich Enten mag.

Continue reading Raspberry Pi 3G mit Huawei E303 und DynDNS (Teil 2)