USB volume knob for Windows, Mac OS and Linux – Part 2

I finally came around finishing this project and I also made a video in which I explain the build and also show you how to assemble the project. This article covers the case design and some changes in the source code in more detail compared to the video.

Continue reading USB volume knob for Windows, Mac OS and Linux – Part 2
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Serial to parallel and parallel to serial conversion with shift registers

Shift registers can be used in a wide variety of applications. You can, for example, use them to convert multiple parallel data lines to a single serial line and vice-versa. This technique can be used to extend the number of available in- and outputs of a microcontroller and this article will show you how you can achieve this.

Continue reading Serial to parallel and parallel to serial conversion with shift registers

How to use the ESP8266 for wireless communication

More than often enough parts of projects will have to communicate with each other or external devices. This can either be done by directly connecting the devices with cables but sometimes it’s more convenient to wirelessly connect the different pieces of hardware. This article will show you how to use the ESP8266 and it also includes two examples for using it with a Raspberry Pi and Arduino boards.

Continue reading How to use the ESP8266 for wireless communication

How to use an EEPROM to permanently store data with your Arduino

Some Arduino boards have a built-in EEPROM that can be written to and read from in your programs. I not only want to discuss how that’s possible but I also want to show you an alternative while talking about EEPROMs and memory in general.

Continue reading How to use an EEPROM to permanently store data with your Arduino

Nixie tube thermometer – Part 3

In the third part of this series, I want to talk about the PCB design and the custom case for the electronics. I’ll also revisit the transistor array, which I didn’t finish in part 1 of this series and I test the completed project and show it in action. Continue reading Nixie tube thermometer – Part 3

VGA signal generation using discrete electronic components

It’s been a while since I published this series of articles on nerdhut about monochrome video signals for an old Macintosh CRT. I wanted to post a short follow-up article about VGA and how to generate such signals. This article will also be a follow up to the custom CPU series and it will be another step towards the custom computer, I always wanted to design and build.

However, in this article, I only want to take a look at how the standard 640×480@60Hz VGA-Signal can be created using a screen testing device, made from discrete electronic components, which can be used to test monitors without the need of a computer being around. Continue reading VGA signal generation using discrete electronic components