Raspberry Pi 3G using a Huawei E303 modem and DynDNS (English)

Long-time readers of this website might recognize this article. It was the first article, I published on nerdhut. As of today, this is still one of the most popular articles on the page and because of that, I decided to shorten it a bit and translate it to English.

However, the original German version remains online here!

Introduction

Due to my work on a remote-controlled unmanned ground vehicle, I searched for a way to control it anywhere in the world. Because I wanted it to have a high range and reliability, I decided to communicate with it over the internet, which should be available almost anywhere on the planet. Continue reading Raspberry Pi 3G using a Huawei E303 modem and DynDNS (English)

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Nixie tube thermometer – Part 3

In the third part of this series, I want to talk about the PCB design and the custom case for the electronics. I’ll also revisit the transistor array, which I didn’t finish in part 1 of this series and I test the completed project and show it in action. Continue reading Nixie tube thermometer – Part 3

VGA signal generation using discrete electronic components

It’s been a while since I published this series of articles on nerdhut about monochrome video signals for an old Macintosh CRT. I wanted to post a short follow-up article about VGA and how to generate such signals. This article will also be a follow up to the custom CPU series and it will be another step towards the custom computer, I always wanted to design and build.

However, in this article, I only want to take a look at how the standard 640×480@60Hz VGA-Signal can be created using a screen testing device, made from discrete electronic components, which can be used to test monitors without the need of a computer being around. Continue reading VGA signal generation using discrete electronic components

Nixie tube thermometer – Part 1

Years ago I bought a bunch of IN-14 Nixie tubes from the Ukraine and I had them lying around since then. I always wanted to use them for a custom device and so I decided to finally tackle this project and build something that utilizes this almost ancient way of displaying digits, but for now I didn’t want to build a Nixie tube clock (I thought that was a bit of a cliché thing to do and for now I’ve had enough of fancy hipster clock projects), so I thought: Why not build a thermometer for my room that can be activated by clapping? Continue reading Nixie tube thermometer – Part 1

USB volume knob for Windows, Mac OS and Linux – Part 1

In this article I want to take a look at the Atmel ATmega32U4 8-Bit microcontroller, which has a USB 2.0 controller built-in and therefore should enable anybody to make their own USB compatible HID devices. I’ll try to show the process by building a USB volume knob, which will allow the end-user to change the volume or completely mute all sounds on the device it is connected to. Continue reading USB volume knob for Windows, Mac OS and Linux – Part 1